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Linda Blondheim Art Collector Map
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Make yours @ BigHugeLabs.com

Sunday, December 23, 2007

Happy Holidays

Dear Friends,
I wish you all the happiest of holidays and I'll return with tips after January 1, 2008.
Love,
Linda

Saturday, December 22, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Prairie
14x18 inches
Oil on panel

Purchase HERE

Painters Tip


The Value of Thumbnails


Get in the habit of doing quick thumbnail sketches before you start to paint. You can use index paper gridded off into 9 blocks. Take a pencil and do several sketches of a scene you have in mind. They can just be line drawings with no values or detail. After you do 8 thumbnails, take a look and circle the best three. Take a bit of time to think about why they are the best and then do one more with the elements you like from the best. Now you have a clear understanding of the proposed composition and it will go quickly and easily for you in the final painting. This works both with photos and in painting on location.

Friday, December 21, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Red Sky
watercolor on cold press
5x7 inches
unframed
40.00
4.00 shipping
See my paintings HERE


Art Notes Blog HERE


Painters Tip

When you are starting out in the business of selling your art, there are many decisions to make and they should be made very carefully with much forethought. It is easy to get trapped in a system that is not right for you, and difficult to make transitions later.

There are lots of options for you and finding the right one is important. I break them down into main categories:

Street festivals and Mall art festivals- This can be a good route for someone starting out. Just like any other venue, name branding is important and it takes time to move up through the system. I spent many years as a street festival artist, and I learned a lot. The limitations for this kind of venue are two fold. You must decide to go for the prize money or go for the sales. Rarely do artists succeed with both. The sales often come to artists who rely heavily on reproductions. The prizes often go to arists with more contemporary work, limited to large paintings with few in the booth. Often the same artists win at most shows. I believe that many sales are in the lower end. High end patrons tend to avoid street fairs, but many corporations add to their collections at fairs. It is a physicaly demanding route to take. Long hours, lots of putting up and taking down of equipment, constant travel. You must conted with severe weather as well. I am generalizing here. Of course there are many exceptions.


Galleries- Most artists aspire to being represented by galleries. I moved from street fairs to galleries about 15 years ago. Galleries come in all price ranges and tastes from neighborhood gift shops to very high toned establishments. They have a great deal of control over the artists they represent and set the price range, though not directly. If you show in galleries, you must have consistent retail pricing. They also often have territorial rights from 30-100 miles in radius so that an artist must show with them exclusively in their area. The artist has little to say about how many works will be shown, or even if they will be allowed to stay with the gallery after an introductory time period. Some galleries are wonderful to work with, and very professional. Others are a complete nightmare. An artist often finds this out too late to save their work or get payed. I have had dealings with both. Gallery representation will give you a certain amount of prestige and look good on your resume, especially for an emrging artist.


Self Representation- This is great category if you have self discipline. If not, I don't recommend this one. Let someone else handle your work. Self rep take a great deal of organizational skills, the willingness to work very hard and a great game plan. You should understand and embrace marketing to self rep. You must be willing to show your work in alternative spaces and self promote. You must be willing to have a commerce web site and be willing to promote your studio with parties, mail outs and other outside the box ideas. You must genuinely like meeting people and sharing your work with others. It takes a lot of energy to self rep. The best part is that you are in control of your studio, not someone else. If you handle it poorly, you will starve.

Combination Selling- This is where I am presently. I am self repping more each year but I am also represented by several galleries in the South. I also have an agent and a copywriter who does my PR for me now. This is an ideal place to be because I do have control over my career. I don't rely on my galleries to furnish my income, they are gravy if you will. After 30 + years of being an artist, I feel it is a good time to set my own direction and make decisions for myself. With Internet commerce growing every year, I believe artists will have more and more control over their career and have the opportunity to deal directly with patrons in a more personal way. This is not for the reclusive personality who doesn't want to interact with patrons. They are better off with an agent or with commercial galleries. Personally, I love knowing the kind people who support me. Most of my patrons become my friends. A definite bonus.

You must think carefully about which method will work for you in the long term. It may be a combination of the above methods. Think and plan before you automatically decide.

Thursday, December 20, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Orange Dunes
5x7 inches
watercolor on cold press
unframed
40.00
4.00 shipping

Purchase HERE


Painters Tip

The 30 Minute Studio Clean-up

I have a lot of visitors to my studio. This is wonderful and I look forward to each one with joy. It is a working studio so there are lots of projects going on in various stations around the room. I have an acrylic station, a watercolor and drawing station and an oil painting station. Of course there are various paintings hanging and stacked everywhere too. It can quickly get out of hand during busy times. I keep one rule,and that is to make sure there is no more mess than 30 minutes of clean-up at any time. I live 13 miles from the city and it takes about 20-30 minutes to get here. When people call to say they are coming, I have time to pick up the studio and go into the house and prepare a tray of food and drinks for them.

I keep various things in my refrigerator and pantry which will be a good snack, and that I can put together quickly. If you do nothing else to welcome visitors, do that. The food and beverage brings the biggest compliment I receive when visitors come, aside from the focus on paintings. They love having a nice snack to nosh on while they look. In fact, regular visitors look forward to the treats.

I think of my studio as my home, and when friends come, I want them to be nourished and cared for.

Wednesday, December 19, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Palms
5x7 inches
watercolor on cold press

See my paintings HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE


Painters Tip

Here are a few tools I keep with me for plein air work. They come in handy regularly. Some painters don't realize that you can do larger format paintings on a pochade box by simply using a small bungee cord or spring clamp. I do up to 14x18 inches on my 9x12 Guerilla box. I just set the panel on the inside lip and use a clamp to secure one edge to the back of the box lid. It works great. You can also use a much smaller panel than your box is made for in the same way, without the expense of the panel insets that box makers sell. Just use the spring clamp to clamp the panel or canvas to the lid.

The other option for larger than box canvases is to run a bungee cord behind the panel and box, hooking the metal hook on each edge of the canvas/panel front. Another way to use spring clamps and bungees is to lash down your palette in windy weather. It works great, though you will probably get paint on the cord or clamp.

Tuesday, December 18, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Work in Progress
12x16 inches
oil on panel

See my paintings HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE


Painter's Tip

I started the painting above out on location. I have been studying the NOTAN process for several months and did this painting, using that process. In Notan, it is advisable to use one value to dominate, either a mid value, light or dark value. It is not always easy to make that decision successfully and it takes a fair amount of imagination and forethought. NOTAN is not free form or random. It is pretty deliberate. I like to simplify the values to include no more than four or five. Less is more with NOTAN painting. I must admit after a few months of trial and error, I am starting to get the advantage to this process. If you want to learn about values, study NOTAN.

Monday, December 17, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings




See my paintings HERE


Art Notes Blog HERE


Painters Tip


A good way to discern the value and color of an area you are painting is by comparing it to colors and values positioned near it. Get into the habit of doing a lot of comparing and you will soon find that it becomes so much easier to nail it the first try.

Using your peripheral vision can also help you to see values and colors positioned close together. Because your peripheral vision is not as sharp, you will not be distracted by sharp detail and will instead, be able to compare color and value without distractions.

Sunday, December 16, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Lavender Sky
2 1/2 x 3 1/2 inches
watercolor on paper

See my paintings HERE

Art Notes HERE


Painters Tip

Checking Vertical and Horizontal Relationships of Objects in Paintings

When you are painting subjects from life,use a long stick. I use a dowel about 20 inches long. It's almost as accurate to use a pencil or a brush handle held in the fingers at arm's length between the subject and your eyes. For horizontal relationships, just hold the dowel horizontally, and you can see at what angle the edge of a ship's sail is in relation to the horizontal - 45 degrees, 90 degrees. etc. This is good when appearances can tend to be deceiving. Holding up the dowel and measuring widths, and heights in relationships to each other will really help you to see their comparisons as well as placing them accurately in the painting composition. They are often not at all the sizes that you assumed they were.

Blondheim Art Original Paintings

See my paintings HERE

Art Notes Blog Here


Painters Tip

Keep a mini portfolio in your car.

You never know when opportunities will come. I like to keep some promotional materials in the car with me. I use Excel or my Working Artist software to make a gallery sheet of images with title,medium, size and price of 10 or so paintings. I make a few brochures on my home computer, and a bio/statement/brief resume/business cards and list of galleries where I show my work. I put all of these in a manilla envelope and keep it in the trunk of my car.

I also use a three ring binder with the office supply clear inserts in it. I put small watercolor paintings and studies in oils and acrylics, back to back in the binder. I use different binders fordifferent price ranges, usually 50.00 paintings in one and 100.00 paintings in another. Just a few at a time, so that interested people can flip through them. I take these with me and use them at various opportunities.

I have sold quite a few paintings this way, putting the binders out in places where I am painting with lots of people coming and going.

You just never know when opportunities will come along and it's good to be ready.

Friday, December 14, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Mail Art
Beach Tree
2 1/2 x 3 1/2 inches
watercolor on cold press
mounted to mat board
11.00
.60 shipping

See my paintings HERE

Art Note Blog HERE

Painters Tip


For beginners like me in Watercolor


I've been doing a bit of watercolor painting for the first time in my life. Here is what I have learned so far.

I like cold press paper. It seems to be nicer than the hot press I have seen. In order to get darks and rich color saturation, multiple coats are necessary. It's easy to get darks but nearly impossible for me to get lights unless I use some sort of masking device like frisket. I discovered that a white candle does great stuff. It masks color and also creates really interesting textures like stippling. Way cool. I've learned that the planning has to be much more careful than oils or acrylics and mistakes don't get fixed very easily. It is a really fast medium.

I don't like the wet paper approach too much. To soft and smarmy. I prefer more intense dry brush technique, with nice crisp line work. I did a watercolor on gessoed masonite and it turned out alright. I noticed right away that lifting of color was very easy with the masonite as opposed to the paper. I used a spray varnish to seal it and now it can be framed like an oil or acrylic. It was very fast. I'm going to try some of the watercolor canvas and see how that works. I can mount it to masonite

I haven't a clue as to what I am doing but I am learning fast and I think it is going to be a good medium for small format work. I'm looking forward to the process.

Thursday, December 13, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Mail Art
Brown Dune
2 1/2 x 3 1/2 inches
watercolor on mat board
envelope included

11.00

See my paintings HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE


Painters Tip

An artist emailed me asking for my opinion on what makes a good web site for art sales.

Here are some important things to me. These are things I would look for as a buyer of art, which I am.

A shopping cart system or www.paypal.com with buttons under each painting. I want to be able to purchase immediately if I wish to, and it must be easy.

Good sized Images of paintings, get rid of thumbnails. I find them to be very annoying. I don't want to have to click on them to see a full image and I don't. I would much rather see 10 good images than dozens of thumbnails.

Images rotated frequently. I want to see new things each time I visit.

I want to read about the artist and see their personality, not just a dry bio and statement. I want to know what their passion is for in their art.

I want to see their events and studio news, updated in a timely way.

I want to read interesting material on their about me page and see pictures of them working.

I love to see WIP's and read about their process.

I want to know where they show their work so I can see it if I am traveling.

I want to sign up for their Rss Feed or opt in mailing list.

I want to read a newsletter at least once a month.

I want it to be easy to find them by typing in relevant key phrases in the search engines.

Having a blog is a good supplement or substitute for a web site and you should have links to your blogs on your site.

I want to be entertained and fascinated by a web site. I don't want the usual boring site with paintings, bio,etc. I like content and lots of it.

I am getting ready to pay a new webmaster to tweak my site, add RSS feeds, and text to improve the SEO. You need to do that at least once in a while to keep it as high as possible in searches. It takes lots of viewers to sell paintings.

Wednesday, December 12, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Mail Art
Dune Shadows
2 1/2 x 3 1/2
Watercolor on Index Paper
Envelope Included
11.00
.60 shipping

Purchase HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE


Painters Tip


The Secret to Improving

People ask me all the time how to get better at painting.

Here are a few ways to improve:

Show Up!! This sounds silly but I mean it. Paint every day whether you feel inspired or not. Good painting has nothing to do with being in the mood. Good painters work whether they feel like it or not.

Study!! Get in the habit of doing a lot of small format studies in specific areas of painting. If you need work in composition, do lots of studies in composing tiny paintings. If you don't know how to paint water, go out to a lake or to the beach and practice multiple studies in water pattern, light on water, dull days on water, wave action, etc. Do hundreds of little water only paintings. Don't worry about making finished paintings, just do parts and pieces of your subject and do them over and over until they start looking pretty good. The same goes for mediums, brushwork, etc.

Research!! Do a lot of reading on techniques, mediums, subjects. There is a wealth of information available on painting. Study specific areas of interest and learn as much as you can.

Find a teacher!!! If you feel you are going nowhere on your own, find a good painting teacher. I'm not talking about the many who paint while you watch and collect your money. I'm talking about a painting teacher who will take the time to take you step by step and who will give you specific tasks and exercises to improve your work. Study with someone who really loves teaching rather than painters who just want to make money.

Be a real Student!!! Once you find a good teacher, you need to accept the role of student with grace and determination. Don't be one of the many who think, I already know what I want to do, This is weird, etc. Be willing to step out of your comfort zone and try things you haven't thought of before.

Start being consistent with the above options and you will start to improve. Don't keep doing what you are doing if it doesn't work. You need to think of new solutions rather than the same old way you have been working. Try a new approach, change to a different medium, try different palette and brushes, new supports, etc. Shake out the cobwebs and start fresh in 2008 with new determination and joy.

Tuesday, December 11, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Homosassa River Palms
5x7 inches
watercolor on cold pressed

40.00
4.00 shipping

Purchase HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE


Studio News

Plein Air Monthly

A once a month plein air class in the North Central Florida area. We will meet at various locations around North Central Florida for painting and instruction.

9 AM- 1:00 PM beginning Saturday, January 5th

As the weather gets hotter in the spring and summer, we will meet at 8 AM in the spring and 7 AM in the summer..

Anyone can come, no matter the experience level. We will study alla prima painting, color mixing, values, composition, brushwork and other components of plein air and landscape painting. This will be a relaxed casual class with lots of painting time and camaraderie. I'll be happy to give advice on equipment, supplies,travel, and marketing. This class is the outdoor version of my monthly open studio class.

Locations to include:

Kanapaha Gardens

Rum Island

Paynes Prairie State Park

Farms and Ranches

The Thomas Center

Lake Alice

Any place we all want to go!!

Fee: 30.00 Payable at each class.

Beverages and snacks provided

Supply list provided

Contact me to register: lindablondheim12@hotmail.com



Painters Tip


There are lots of plein air easels available these days. Your assignment is to try to wade through all of them and find just the right fit for your kind of painting needs. That is not an easy task. I have had dozens of boxes and easels over the years.

Part of your decision must be based on how much you are willing to tote around with you, whether you need to have lightweight equipment for hiking or packing in and out of locations, or whether you have a more civilized approach; Pulling your equipment along in a file box on wheels.

You need to understand whether your comfort zone requires chair, table,umbrella, bags of equipment, large numbers of brushes,paint and supplies etc., or whether you are a minimalist, who carries a paint box and a bottle of water, like me.

Another consideration is your personal aesthetic. There is an easel that I simply could not use because it is ugly. It's expensive and very popular but I hate the way it looks. I know this seems silly but it's not. We need to use equipment that is pleasing to us if we are to do our best work. I recently sold a box for practically nothing because I ordered it and realized after I used it that it was somewhat poorly made. I loved the features and the design, but the craftsmanship was very poor. That bothered me every time I used it. I like well made tools. That may not be important to you or an issue at all, but if it is, be sure to buy well made easels or pochade boxes.


The above factors will help you decide on the equipment which best suits your needs.

Monday, December 10, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings




Three Sisters
5x7 inches
Watercolor on masonite
unframed
65.00

Purchase HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE


Painter's Tip

This is an easy way to make matting spacers for pastel or media you want to separate from the mat and glass in a frame.

Before you assemble the mat/art/frame, turn the mat upside down and cut narrow strips of mat board, one for each edge, smaller than the opening so they don't overlap on each edge. You are going to set them slightly back, away from the edge of the permanent mat and glue them down. If you want to make the space deeper, you can double the thickness of the strips. When it is dry flip over the mat and place on your artwork. There will be a space between the mat and the art due to the little strips. You won't see them. If you have pastels, the dust will fall between the mat and the support, keeping your mat cleaner.

Sunday, December 09, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Work in Progress
Lake Alice
8x10 inches

See my Paintings HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE


Painters Tip

Always Be Prepared

Yesterday I went out to paint at a local lake. I was able to meet two potential patrons because I was open to meeting people and willing to pause in my painting time to meet and talk to them about my work. I always carry business cards with me whenever I paint,and I sent them away with an invitation to come to my studio and visit. It's useful to buy one of the clear plastic brochure holders that stand up. You can put brochures and cards in it and sit it next to your easel. If people are shy, they can pick one up without speaking to you.

You never know when a casual meeting will bring a sale. I did a small unimportant favor a couple of years ago for a woman and yesterday she bought two paintings. The important point here is to expect that people are interested in what you do and to be open and ready to interact with others in a positive way.

If I want to paint by myself, I will stay in my studio or paint on private land. If I go to a public park I must expect to interact with others. Be realistic. Ignoring potential patrons is just not smart. Taking a few minutes to be friendly and kind to someone you meet while painting is not a lot of trouble and you may make their day brighter and more interesting. You never know when they will be in the market for a nice painting. If you are generous with your time, you will be the one they remember.

Saturday, December 08, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Dark Palms
Watercolor on WC paper
5x7 inches
unframed
40.00
Shipping 4.00

Purchase HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE

Painters Tip


Retaining your signature across mediums

It's fun to use a lot of different mediums and I certainly do. I do think it is important to have a consistent look to your work and to the way you approach painting in various mediums. Of course they all have their own characteristics which make them unique. Regardless of the medium I use, you can always see my signature in the commonality of contrast and saturation. Whether I use watercolors, pastels, oils or acrylics, my work has high contrast and deep saturation. because of this, I feel comfortable in showing various mediums together in a body of work. it would not be advisable if my watercolors were pale and pastel and my oils were dark and intense. Because my approach to painting is similar in all mediums, you always know my work.

If your mediums are vastly different in approach, I suggest that you split them up into separate bodies of work for exhibition. You do not want your oils to overpower your pastels or watercolors. Of course, the pricing is going to be different, as oils and acrylics command a higher price than watercolor,pencil or pastels, but knowlegeable patrons expect that and understand the price differences.

Friday, December 07, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Palm Icon Series
Rust Fronds
5x7 inches
watercolor on WC paper
unframed
40.00

Purchase HERE



Painters Tip

Understanding Color

Understanding the properties of color doesn't do much good unless you can put color to practical use.

Color can be used in several ways, including:

1. To give spacial quality to the pictorial field.
Color can supplement or substitute for value differences to give volume.
2. Color can create interest through the counter balance of movement in pictorial space.
3. To create mood and symbolize ideas.
4. To serve as a vehicle for the expression of mood.
5. To direct attention in a composition.
6. To accomplish aesthetic appeal through color relationships and harmonies.
7. To identify objects by describing their appearance.

I have found doing actual paintings in color mixing to be far more valuable than doing color swatches.

Thursday, December 06, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Palm Icons

Cabbage Palm
5x7 inches
watercolor on watercolor paper
Unframed

40.00

Purchase HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE




Painters Tip

Using illustration to promote your art


There are lots of little ways to promote your art to others. Using fun illustration has always been a good way for me. I was recently invited to a cookie party for the holidays. We were encouraged to bring copies of our recipes to share with others. Instead of the usual index card, I printed two recipes per sheet of Index Paper and did a colorful illustration of cooking tools on each recipe. I simply cut the paper in half, making two recipes. I attached a business card to be back and I had instant promotion.





Illustrating all sorts of thank you notes, recipes, letters, forms and other items makes for interesting art to be passed around. Have you thought of illustrations on the bills you send to your local Dr, Dentist, Veterinarian, Insurance Company,and so forth? I also make homemade wrapping paper for gifts with colorful images on the paper. Illustration can be a wonderful way to promote your "real art". I'll bet you can think of dozens of ways to illustrate papers that will be seen by potential buyers.

They don't have to be elegant or detailed. The simplest, thumbnail sized line images are what I do, coloring them with markers, watercolor, or color pencil. They attract attention and they are clever. They remind people that you are an artist and perhaps your work could be useful for them.

I often do illustration work for people who want a unique party invitation, announcement, or memento for a special occasion. The best reason to do these illustrations is that they are just plain fun and good drawing practice for you.

Wednesday, December 05, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Paynes Prairie
12x16 inches
oil on panel
gold frame
Purchase Here

Art Notes Blog HERE


Painting Tip


Painting on your own


I spent two hours today at Paynes Prairie State Park. I painted by myself with no stress or time line. No one to wait for, not coordinating meeting times or waiting for anyone else to start or finish. I was able to park and set up immediately, just my tripod,paint box and painting panel,enjoying the fall afternoon with full concentration.

Most women paint in groups or with buddies. If you have not painted out on your own, please do. It is a wonderful experience. It is truly the free est feeling you can have as an outdoor painter. There is no one talking or moving around. No one standing too close. No one standing in front of your good view. You can come and go as you wish, exploring possible painting sites or settling in right away to work.

Don't be afraid to go. With a few precautions you can be very safe by yourself.

State parks, college campuses, botanical gardens, city parks, private ranches and farms are all great places, as well as fish camps and boat ramps.

Keep your cell phone attached to you and your keys in your pocket. Don't wander too far from your car. Lock all doors except the driver's so you can jump in if you feel uncomfortable. Make sure someone knows the general area where you are going. Don't keep much money on your person; instead leave it in the car trunk.

I have painted all over the Southeastern USA by myself, traveling extensively alone. I have never had an incident. I am careful.

Get out there and enjoy yourself!!!

Tuesday, December 04, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Marion County
16x20 inches
oil on canvas
1200.00

Purchase HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE


Painters Tip


Using the right tools can make you more comfortable in painting. Supports are a good example. I really am not over fond of canvas on panel supports. I much prefer plain gessoed birch or masonite. I don't mind stretched canvas but I don't like it attached to a rigid surface. Who knows why? I just know that I produce better work on a stretched or plain hard surface. On the other hand, I love good linen attached to panels. Go figure.

I also paint better with flats than any other kind of brush. It's not that I can't paint with others, I just feel good with flats.

It's very important to paint with the tools that feel good because that is how you will produce the best paintings. I recently had a student at a workshop who was painting with a brush that she hated. I asked her how long she had been using the brush and she said for awhile. I told her to give it away or throw it away. Obviously, it bothered her to use it or the subject would not have come up. It was distracting her in a negative way.

Don't use paints or supplies that you don't like. Give them away and start fresh with new things you prefer. It may be a while before you will know what suits you best, but it will be well worth the search to find supplies you really like and that will help you to produce your best work.

Monday, December 03, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Rust Colored Palms
Original Mail Art
envelope included

11.00
.60 shipping

Purchase HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE


Painters Tip


What about you?

I like to say that patrons are interested in the artist more than the art. It is important to them to be a part of their favorite artist's life. Studio visits, painting events, demos and other interactive events allow patrons to be involved in some way with their favorite artist. These days it is also possible to have an online friendship with a favorite artist. I have many many Internet friends who follow my career and my art.

One of the important ways to become a real person to patrons is through your web site. Including a work in progress, a weekly or monthly newsletter,and an interesting About the Artist Page will go far in helping you to make friends and promote your art to interested people. If you don't have a web site, start a blog instead. Write about your life as an artist and show photos of your paintings.

My advice is to be as honest and genuine as possible. Don't use a bunch of art speak or try to sound important. Talk about your work and the experience of it in plain language and people will come to read. Even if some people don't like your blog, others will. Talk about your process and technique, your travels, museums and galleries, and your studio. I love reading other artists' blogs. I think pouring your heart into you work and writing about it will attract patrons and friends.

Sunday, December 02, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Lake Alice
8x10 inches
oil on panel
SOLD

See more of my paintings HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE


Painters Tip


Paint while scenes are fresh in your mind.....


Yesterday I started a painting of a scene I saw while traveling the day before. I took lots of photos to use as references for paintings but I wanted to start the painting while the memory was still fresh. I have found that working on paintings right away after seeing something I like, produces a better painting, than waiting for days, weeks or months to revisit the project.

Another helpful habit is to sit down while there or on your return and write notes about the place, the time of day, the weather conditions, angle of the sun, where the major elements were located, the color temperature of foliage and objects, what made you love it and want to paint it. This only takes a few minutes and these notes will be useful when you start the painting.

Saturday, December 01, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Sunrise
6x8 inches
oil on panel
Silver Frame
300.00
Purchase HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE

Painters Tip


Managing your Oil Palette


The cleaner your palette is, the cleaner the color will be in your painting. Messy palettes make muddy paintings.

I like to line my paints up by color groups at the top of my palette in ribbons of color, not blobs. With ribbons, you can pull color off the end, leaving the rest of the ribbon pure and clean. I pull color off and move down the palette to mix below the ribbons.





When you are learning to paint, try to put your paint ribbons out in the same place each time you paint. You will be less likely to dip in the wrong color to mix if you always know they are arranged the same way.

As the palette gets muddy below the ribbons, take a moment to wipe it off and clean that part of it, leaving the ribbons of paint as they are.
You will have a fresh palette to mix on again. I will often do this several times during a session, and the ribbons remain nice and clean for new mixing until they are gone.

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Paynes Prairie
6x8 inches
oil on panel
silver frame
300.00

Purchase HERE


Art Notes Blog HERE


Painters Tip

Using watercolor for studies

This post is for painters who do not use Water Color as a medium


I have discovered that watercolor makes a great medium for miniature studies both in the field and in studio. All of you WC painters are laughing at me as you read this. DUH!!! I have never been a fan of the medium, so I have ignored the possibilities to my shame. I still could never see myself doing serious work with WC but as a study medium it is perfect for me or any other oil painter.

It works particularly well in small format because it is easy to control. One of the things I have never liked about WC is the lack of saturation in most paintings I see. They are pale and insipid, lacking the rich quality of color that acrylics or oils can give. In using the small format of 5x7 or smaller, I noticed that I am able to increase the saturtion quite easily by doing multiple layers in some areas, leaving other areas pale, creating interesting atmosphere.

My discovery of the potential of WC came thanks to my sponsor,Jack Richeson & Company, who sent me a couple of sets of Stephen Quiller Water Colors to try out. They sat around the studio for a couple of months. As many of you know, I do hundreds of tiny studies every year. I use various methods and medium for these miniature paintings, including markers,pens,acrylics, and colored pencils. One of my students gave me a nice little watercolor pad of paper to use for studies. One day I thought humm.... WC paper, WC paint. Why not give it a whirl?






Now I am hooked and having a splendid time doing miniatures with WC. I can see why it is such a popular medium because it is so much faster than other mediums. To do the same painting in acrylic or oil would take about twice the time. For field work it is a great way to do quick painting references you can take back to the studio and work from for oil paintings.

Old dogs can learn new tricks :>)

Friday, November 30, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Crescent Beach Sunrise
16x20 inches
oil on canvas
silver frame
1200.00

Purchase Here

Art Note Blog HERE


Friends,
I love receiving your comments. If you have topics of interest or questions about painting or marketing art that you would like to see answered on this blog, you can email me at lindablondheim12@hotmail.com If I don't have the answer, I'll find it.


Painters Tip


Keep a Tool Kit

Plein air painters will benefit from keeping a cardboard box tool kit with them in the car. A roll of masking tape, duct tape, a 6 inch,12 inch steel ruler, a 12 inch T square, bamboo roll up brush holder with extra brushes,6-8 tube of basic color paints, large spring clamps, sketch book with a few pencils, a small watercolor kit, a small watercolor pad, a small jar of nails/screws, small Philips and straight screw drivers, a tack hammer, a plastic light weight fold up tarp, a small jar of solvent for oil painters, spray bottle for acrylics, bungee cords, lightweight jacket and a pair of socks, sunscreen, hat, 1 gallon jug water, and bug juice.

There are many occasions when you don't expect to be able to paint but the opportunity comes up. You could do some quick sketching or watercolor field studies without setting up you full equipment to paint. There are also unexpected weather conditions and equipment problems when you paint outside. You may need to repair an easel. A dry pair of socks and a jacket could increase your comfort level greatly after an unexpected storm.


I try to keep a box of basic stuff in the trunk of the car all the time. I don't often need it but when I do it's great to be prepared.

Thursday, November 29, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Mail Art
Original Paintings to send through the mail.
Envelope included
11.00
.60 shipping

Purchase HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE


Painters Tip



Checking for the right color

When you are out painting on location, it is often hard to get a match for local color. I do a couple of things which really work well. I use a color isolator. That sound very high tech and cool but it is really a piece of gray mat board with a hole punched in it. Looking at color through the gray board will tell you how close you are. Hold the mat board out at arms length in front of the area you want to match. Then after you have it imprinted in your mind, hold the mat over the color you have mixed on your palette. You will be able to compare without distraction.

The second way is even easier. I load the brush with my paint and hold it out at arm length in front of what I am painting. I know right away whether it is even close in both value and color temperature. I make adjustments, then hold it out again until I have made a good match.

Tuesday, November 27, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



My Yard
12x16 inches
Oil on panel

Purchase HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE


Painters Tip


A Body of Work

You may hear or read that term , Body Of Work, but not really know what the writer refers to.

A body of work is a collection of art with three characteristics:
Consistent theme
Consistent technique
Quantity
A consistent theme and consistent technique define the artist=s visual style and creates an identifiable style.

Sometimes bodies of work just occur with no forethought. The My Yard series started with a single painting. I'm on number four now. Working on a series gives an artist the time to really explore and understand a subject to it's fullest potential.

A series has the potential for an excellent cohesive exhibition.

Generally mine occur because I get very interested in a subject and want to learn more about it. Seeing all of the paintings framed and hung together gives you a sense of pride and accomplishment.

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Fall Trees
Mail Art
Send an original mixed media painting through the mail. Envelope included.
11.00
.60 shipping
Purchase HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE

Ebay Sale HERE Better Hurry!!!


Painters Tip


Organizing the end of an Ebay Sale


I always make sure to save the final paperwork from each sale. I cut off the person's name and shipping address, adding it to my mailing list and taping it down on the top of my mailing box or envelope. I use clear tape to cover it completely so that rain won't ruin it. It saves a lot of writing time and avoids mistakes. I save the top half with the payment info for my files.

I include my business card in each package, because sale paintings often bring larger purchases in the future. I always take the time to email the buyer and thank them for their purchase rather than just sending an invoice. After all, they are supporting me and my family, so they deserve my respect and attention.

I try to send the painting in batches, so that I don't have to make so many trips to the post office. Some people take longer than others to pay, so they are not ready at the same time to send out. I explain to all buyers that it may take a few days before sending out due to batch shipping.

I set up a table in my studio, with the paintings put in the envelopes, waiting for payment. As they are payed, I paste the addresses on the envelopes and tape them up, putting them in a box to carry out to my car. Some buyers purchase multiple paintings and want combined shipping. I put them all in a flat rate box, knowing that it will be one fee for all weights. I'm not in the business of overcharging people for shipping. I just want them to get their paintings and enjoy them.

Monday, November 26, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Overcast Day
12x16 inches
oil on panel
silver frame
800.00

Purchase HERE

Hurry! Ebay Studio Sale HERE



Art Notes Blog HERE


Painters Tip



More fun with color mixing

Matching Color values with a value scale is a challenging way to paint. Everyone does value studies with black and white. But so what? How does that relate to painting values in color? A great way to practice is by limiting the values in your painting. Choose the mid ranges and try to match them up with color.

Keep a small color wheel with you all the time and the Jack Richeson & Company color wheels have good value scales right on the wheel. I leave my wheel in the plastic package it came in. I can touch my loaded brush to the plastic over the color or value I'm trying to match, and then just wipe it off.

Use small panels or canvas for a values exercise.

Start by doing a black and white study with the value range of 3-5 for darks and the range of 6-8 for lights. Now do the exact same scene with color and try matching those values.

One way to know whether the values are similar is to place the two paintings side by side. Squint your eyes to barely see. You will be able to tell.

Sunday, November 25, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Paynes Prairie
14x18 inches
oil on panel
1000.00
Warm silver frame

Purchase HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE

Hurry! Ebay sale ends soon HERE


Painters Tip



For landscape painters



SLOW DOWN



Make a plan for yourself before you begin your painting. Ask yourself some questions.

Where will you place major elements in your painting?

Where will you place the focal point or area of interest?

Where will be secondary elements of interest?

Wiill there be tertiary elements?

Where is the direction of light coming from?

What is the angle of light?

What will be the mood and atmosphere of your painting? Bright Light? Tonal Light? 

How will you lead the viewer through the composition? Curves, connecting values? Patterns?



You must write down your questions and then write the answers on paper, step by step. Then begin your painting and follow your own road map to completion. Can you justify the choices you have made in your process, so that they mimic your painting plan? If not, why did you change the plan?


Get in the habit of making a good plan in advance and you will have better paintings.

Friday, November 23, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings

This Post is for Saturday. I am away teaching a workshop.




Palms on County Road 320
16x20 inches
oil on canvas
1200.00
Purchase HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE

Ebay Sale HERE


Painters Tip




Quick Study Medium

I have found that permanent magic markers are a wonderful medium for painting studies. They look like watercolor when they dry and they are quick and easy to use, easy to transport, and they last a long time. You don't need any water or brushes. They can be used just about anywhere and be carried in a small tote bag with a small watercolor paper pad. These days they come in sophisticated palettes of subtle colors. Gone are the days of the bright primary colors only. You can make fine lines to thick washes with the same marker. Overlapping of colors is also possible.

I use the ChartPak brand. HERE

They are wonderful and come in lots of colors, including many subtle grays. They are also nontoxic.

The next time you want to do quick thumbnail paintings, try markers instead of paint.

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Chicken Coop
8x10 inches
acrylic on panel

See my paintings HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE

My Ebay Sale HERE


Painters Tip

Intensity of Color



There are four ways to change the intensity of colors when mixing paint.

As white is added to any hue the tone becomes lighter in value but it also loses it’s brightness or intensity.

When black is added to a hue, the intensity diminishes as the value darkens.

You can't change value without losing intensity, although they are not the same property.

The third method of changing intensity involves mixing a neutral gray of the same value as the hue. The mixture is then a variation in intensity without a change in value. The color become less bright with each addition of gray but the value remains unchanged.

The fourth way to change the intensity of any hue is by adding it’s complement. The mixture of two hues that occur exactly opposite each other on the color wheel; red/green, yellow/purple, and orange/blue. The complimentary colors represent an equal balance of the three primaries.

The dominating color in the mixture of compliments gives it’s bias to the neutral. A gray mixed with yellow/purple/white can either have a cooler tone with more purple or a warmer tone with more yellow.

Wednesday, November 21, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



My Yard III
14x18 inches
oil on canvas

Work In Progress




Painters Tip


Limiting shapes in values

The painting above is a work in progress I started this morning out in my yard. I am ever aware of the NOTAN approach to painting and so I have tried to simplify the shapes as well as the values in this painting. In my study of NOTAN, I am seeing more and more emphasis in simplifying my composition into fewer shapes/masses and fewer values.

It is a completely different approach to painting than anything I have done before and it suits my work so well. I have never been a realist painter, never had an interest in copying nature. I am an expressionist and my focus has always been on studying the complexity of design. The fact that I love Essentially, the above painting simplifies the masses into a few shapes and connects dark or light throughout the painting. I try to form the connections of shapes throughout, using positive and negative shapes to form transitions between dark and light areas. There are of course multiple values, but basically it is a three value painting with dark being dominant.

Tuesday, November 20, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Evinston Florida Farm
18x24 inches
Oil on Canvas
1600.00

Purchase HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE

Ebay Sale NOW HERE


Painters Tip

Studying Values effectively in your composition

The NOTAN study really helps me learn about values by applying the following methods:

Try using a dominant value in the painting. This gives the viewer clues and helps them to understand the basic structure of the painting.

Look for scenes which will allow you to condense your values to just a few basic ones within the range of 5 or less.

Don't get bogged down on fussy shapes. Keep them massed rather than linear.

Be aware of the planes in objects as I mentioned before.

Use your imagination to make the shapes you see a bit more interesting. You don't have to copy nature. Create it instead.

Whenever possible, learn to connect value shapes within the painting, creating paths for the viewer and connecting elements in the painting.

Keep studies small. It's better to do dozens of small paintings than a few large ones when you are learning. I do from 30 to 40 miniature studies each week. I learn quickly from all of these small paintings. It saves my resources for larger finished works.

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Eggplant
Mail Art
Original Drawing with Envelope
Send original art through the mail
11.00


Purchase HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE

Linda's Annual Ebay Sale HERE


Painters Tip


More on Using Planes

Here is an exercise I use myself and give to my students.

Pictorial Depth Exercise


The simplest and most useful shape in pictorial forms of art is the plane. The surface that we work on is called the picture plane. It is also used as a way to simplify the shapes, masses and points in nature. Planes are used to create orderly parts of a painting. Planes vary from showing flat two dimensional shapes to shapes which look like they have depth. We use many shapes to achieve decorative and realistic effects of depth. Intervals and overlapping shapes can make a painting look more three dimensional. I think of a painting as shapes, and angles, like puzzle pieces. Adding sizes, colors, values, textures and contrast will make those basic shapes start to come to life.

Start your painting with simple flat shapes, laying in the major element in shapes. Use very thin paint in a wash.
You are then going to start overlapping these shapes, adding value shapes, paying attention to negative shapes as well as positive shapes. Think of the painting as shapes being placed over shapes in multiple layers. You will do no blending in this painting, but instead use stippling,long and short strokes. Leve the paint where you put it without giving in to the desire to blend. Do your mixing on the palette, not the canvas. Keep the painting clean and crisp.

Monday, November 19, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings

My Ebay Sale is HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE

Painters Tip

My painters tip today comes from Michael Masterson's Newletter Early To Rise. I thought it was great advice.



How to Take Advantage of Free Publicity

By Michael Masterson

There is nothing that will help you get yourself, your company, or your products recognized better or faster than getting the news media to see you/them as news. Every day, small businesses are propelled into the local or even national spotlight thanks to some journalist or radio or TV personality.

A book I once wrote on China became a quick best-seller (and got reprinted by Rand McNally) thanks to a positive review that somehow got picked up by the media. A student of American Writers and Artists Inc. (AWAI) has a very nice side business based solely on press releases he puts out during holidays. And just think about what Oprah has done for dozens of otherwise unknown novelists.

Not everyone can take advantage of free publicity. You need to offer something new and different - or make it seem so. The secret to getting covered is to forget for a moment about yourself and your product and think about the editor/producer you are targeting. What are his readers/viewers looking for?

I used to be a media person, so I have an idea of what they want.

Imagine their lives. These people are generally young and know little or nothing about business. They are understandably pro-consumer, assuredly news hungry, and overworked.

Most of the media people you want to reach are prejudiced against press releases. Yet they keep a stack of them around... just in case. When a deadline is approaching and the stuff they've been working on has disintegrated, they turn to that despised stack of self-interested hype to see if they can find something they can use.

They don't have time to fool around reading every release carefully. It's "search and dispose" time -much like what direct-mail prospects do when they come home to a mailbox full of junk mail.

Give them a reason to see your effort as ordinary or irrelevant, and it's gone faster than a six-pack of Guinness at an Irish funeral. If they suspect your press release is self-serving, it's gone. Like this widely lampooned memo from Michael Milken's public relations staff:

"Michael Milken is often identified incorrectly in news reports because rushed copy editors or writers fall back on old cliches that gained currency through the efforts of his competitors' public relations departments many years ago. Mike (what everyone calls him) heads or works with several organizations, including the Milken Institute (an economic think tank), the National Prostate Cancer Coalition..."

Milken's PR people got a lot of press with this effort - all of it negative.

And don't believe for a second the old aphorism about all publicity's being good publicity. Bad publicity hurts.

When I write a press release, I write something that I would have used when I was a journalist - and that means something that is:

1. newsworthy

2. useful to the publication's readers

3. humble (Bragging is fatal.)

4. written well enough that it doesn't need much editing

Humor is tricky, but it can work - especially if it deflects the journalist's attention away from your promotional intent. "If this guy is making fun of himself," the journalist might think, "he can't be bad."

Here are some "rules" suggested in DM News by Steve Dubin, president of PR Works in Kingston, MA:

Make it new. Unless you make your press release sound like news, your chances of seeing it published are next to zilch.
Benefit the right reader. Nobody cares about your product/service but you... unless you point out how useful it can be to the readers you're aiming at.
Highlight the way your product/service is part of a hot trend. (Media people love trends.)
Be timely. A dating website is a hotter topic on Valentine's Day than on Veterans Day.
Highlight the irony. What is the surprise? The contrast?
Use surveys. Seemingly objective surveys can be intriguing.
Show how good you are. Journalists like do-gooders but are skeptical of them. So if you take this route, do it well.
Drop names. When David hooks up with Goliath, that's news.
Use case studies. How does your product/service help people?
One final bit of advice: Make sure you always follow up on your press releases, especially to your most important media contacts. But don't call them right before the deadline and don't harass them. Get them to think of you as someone who is helping them do their jobs, not as a pest.

[Ed. Note:

Sunday, November 18, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



My Yard Final
11x14 inches
oil on linen
700.00

Purchase HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE



Painters Tip

Revisiting an alla prima painting.

I showed you this painting right off the easel en plein air a few days ago. After it dried up a bit, I did a little refinement to improve it without drastically changing it. I think paintings should be refined, if they can be improved without changing the basic format, color and structure. A stroke here and there or an adjustment in contrast or value. Perhaps a bit of addition to the composition, with changes that definitely make it a better painting, are the criteria I use.

I don't think it is wise to try to repaint it. If it's a bad painting and needs major reconstruction, it's better to sand it down and start a new painting.

Often times it's simply a matter of a bit more focus on the star of the production, or a clean up in brushwork after it has dried enough. Most of my studio corrections to alla prima take less than ten minutes.

The best judgement in correction comes after putting the painting away for a day or two, not jumping too soon to do any changes or improvements. You will be far better equipped to make good decisions after you give your eyes and brain a rest before trying to improve paintings.

Friday, November 16, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Fall in My Yard
12x16 inches
oil on linen
800.00
Purchase HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE


Linda's Ebay Sale November 19-29, 2007



Painters Tip


More on Values

I did the above painting in my yard Friday afternoon. The scene was very simple and straightforward, with little interest other than the fiery red tree.

To give the painting drama, I focused on that tree, making the more dominant sized tree much darker than it actually was. I was ever aware of the NOTAN process of making values more dramatic than in reality. Pushing the values in the painting gives it much more pizaz than the actual scene was showing. Making most of the color fairly neutral and dark against the tree gives it far more star power than it would have had with accurate values. I also used little texture in the forward tree on the right, saving all of the sharp textural brushork for the star of the scene.

All of this takes planning. I like to think about what I want to do before I dig in to start. Where will the dominant value be in the painting? Will it be dark, light, mid value? Where will the color intensity be most evident? If I contain it and make it sing in the area of focus, leaving everything else fairly neutral, it will really be powerful.

I will leave this painting in the rotation for a few days and then go back to correct any errors.

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



River Palms
12x16 inches
oil on panel
champagne silver frame
800.00

Purchase HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE


Linda's Ebay Sale November 19-29, 2007


Painters Tip


Working with Values

I study NOTAN. One of the benefits of that process is learning to simplify values successfully. I use about five values in my work, sometimes more, sometimes less. One of the things NOTAN taught me is to emphasize one dominant value in my paintings. I try to Analise the scene and think, What is the dominant value here?

One of the exercises I like to do is the three value dominant paintings. I will do a series of light value paintings, a series of mid value paintings and a series of dark value paintings. These are the 9, 2 1/2 inch by 3 1/2 inch paintings on index paper. They are very small and I can paint them quickly. After this exploration, I am ready to start a large painting with a plan. I know where I am going with the values. Since I use a tetradic palette with the orange/blue and red/green compliments, I also know where I will be going with color.

If all this seems formulaic, it is in a way, but there is so much room for interesting accidents, my intuitive side has equal opportunity.

Thursday, November 15, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Christmas Tree
2 1/2 x 3 1/2 inches
Mixed media on Index Paper

See My Paintings HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE


Linda's Annual Ebay Studio Sale November 19-29 2007



Painters Tip

Get your client's attention


The holidays give you a perfect opportunity to show off a bit and give your clients and friends a small holiday treat.

Most artists send a greeting card of one of their paintings to clients. I used to do that too each year. It's nice and I'm sure they enjoy it, but how about sending them an original piece of Mail Art? That is what I'm doing this year. I made mixed media miniatures of trees for my clients and friends this year, mounting them to mat board cut the size to fit in invitation envelopes. You can buy invitation envelopes in buff or white, at any office supply store. You don't have to send holiday themes. You can send any design or subject you please. These tiny paintings will sit on a decorative easel and they can bring them out each year for the holidays to enjoy.

I sign the back with a hand written greating in green or red ink. You can also put a small studio label on them if you wish. If I were a client, wouldn't I be more impressed by an original piece of art as a greeting instead of a reproduction? You bet!!

I use mat board scraps for the backing and markers and pins for the drawings. The cost is minimal.

These little drawings turned out so well that I decided to create a line of mail art in varous subjects to sell. I package them with an envelope and a label on the back that says:

Mail Art
Linda Blondheim Art Studio
Send Original Art
First Class Stamp

The label lets buyers know that the art is designed to be mailed.

Send your clients something special this year. Your gift will stand out!!

Wednesday, November 14, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



My Yard
11x14 inches
oil on panel
gold frame
700.00

Purchase HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE

Linda's Ebay Studio Sale November 19-29


Painters Tip


The painting above was heavily influenced by the NOTAN process of painting. If you want to learn something about values, I highly recommend that you study this way of painting. NOTAN means dark and light in Japanese, though there is not a literal translation. It is much more complicated than that simple definition. It is a step by step process of discovery. I've been studying the process for about 7 months but have a long way to go. It has to do with the arrangement of dark and light in your painting. Making decisions about which values will dominate the composition and so forth. I have found that it helps me simplify the way I look at a composition. It works very well with my painting style because I like contrast and very crisp values.

I have trimmed down to a five value system for quite some time. It makes painting simple for me. The NOTAN process fits me very well. However, I don't know that it will be as useful for painters who like lots of detail in their work. NOTAN tends to be mass oriented rather than detail oriented,at least for me, though of course it could be adapted to any style.

Monday, November 12, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Fall Reflections
8x10 inches
oil on panel

See my paintings HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE


Don't forget my Ebay sale November 19-29, 2007


Painters Tip




I paint on location a lot and so I am always concerned with light in my paintings. They are high contrast and full of light. I think that is the consistency of my work, light and contrast.

Here are some elements of light:


Light Source- Where is the light on an object coming from? It can be from several sources, including direct light from the sun as well as ambient light. It can be diffused or focused, bright or dim. It's position and intensity can effect the appearance and the mood of a painting.

Highlight- The brightest point of light on an object. It is found in the middle of the lightest area and is a reflection of the source of light. It can be hard or diffused and gives a visual clue to the texture of an object. (Shiny metal will give off a different highlight than an orange)

Light Mass- This is the area of an object which receives direct light. The light mass can have variation depending on the height and angle of the light source. For instance, the sun may be showing as back lit straight up, side lit and diffused by fog, etc.

Shadow Mass- This is the part of an object that is hidden from the sun and not lighted. It can be small areas or large, depending on the shape of an object.

Cast Shadow- This is the shadow which is a result of the object being in light. The sun or light source cannot reach the area which is closest to the object away from the light source. A cast shadow is darkest close to the object and then becomes lighter as it moves away, because filtered light is reaching it.

Reflected Light- This is dim light reflected into shadows from other surfaces.

Sunday, November 11, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Lake Alice
8x10 inches
oil on panel
SOLD

See my paintings HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE



Linda's Ebay Studio Sale- November 19-29



Painters Tip

Getting ready for the Ebay Sale

You have decided on a date for the sale. The next step is to photograph all of the paintings and save the images in a folder. You will need to purchase envelopes for the paintings to fit in if they are on panels, or order boxes from the Post Office if you are selling stretched paintings. You will need to box up a painting for each size you re selling and have the PO weigh them for you to get the postage. I just use a flat rate for mine because they are all small enough to fit in a Manila envelope. Don't over charge for shipping. In fact I charge a bit less than the actual postage for some, because people are put off by high shipping fees.

Make a template for the sale paintings and you can reuse it for all of them. I always list a small miniature for a couple of weeks before the sale so I can put an announcement for the sale in my listing well in advance. You will need to send out a couple of email announcements a week or two before your sale to give people a heads up. Be sure to include all information about the sale listings in that email so people will know exactly what you are offering,how to find the listings, and the price and shipping. You could do a postal mail out with a card, but I don't because I don't want to invest a lot of capital for a sale. I always put the announcement everywhere I can that is free online. I always list all of the paintings for the same opening bid and shipping rate. It is just easier.

Before the sale you will need to get all of your promotional materials together and any packing materials that you are going to need. I like to list everything on the same day so it will all end the same day and I can pack it all up and take it all to the PO the same day if possible. I always use paypal. I always list the sale for 10 days to give people plenty of time to find the sale and bid.

I also always save the emails from buyers to use the next year. Some of them will be bad by then but many of them will still be good. Get all of your paintings, packing materials,promotional materials and put them in the same place for easy packing and sealing. Check all paintings twice to the buyer to make sure the are not mixed up. I did that once. Had to pay both parties to re-ship to each other. Not a great idea!!!

The main focus must be on promotion and getting the word out to clients, family and friends. Use good keywords like Landscape, plein air,portrait,still life,studio sale,etc. Don't use words that are cutsy, like "pink bunny", "Wow" or "Look at this". I always start my listing with Blondheim Art because people know to search with my last name or art. My listing will look like this:


Blondheim Art Studio Sale Landscapes NR

Best of luck!!

Saturday, November 10, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Florida Trail Palms
24x24 inches
oil on canvas

See my paintings HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE


Painters Tip

Why have a studio sale?

The obvious answer is to make money, but there are other good reasons too. No one stays in the same place as a painter. Hopefully we are growing in our technique, and our muse. Our style evolves over a period of a year. If you are like me, you are always involved in new study. I do hundreds of studies in small sizes. Sometimes they sell at retail and sometimes not. I also do a fair number of experiments that I am not really satisfied with, but someone else might love. In fact, some paintings sell well that I would not have expected to and others that I simply love, do not sell in the galleries.

I put all of my studies and older works in a browse bin in my studio at a reduced price. At the end of the year, I put what's left on Ebay for my annual sale, see above. The fun of an Ebay sale is that they often go for a higher price than they would have in the browse bin. Go figure!!

I think it's important to have a fresh start every year. Cleaning out the studies makes patrons happy to have affordable work and gives me space to start with the new year's work. I also think it is important to show fresh new work in galleries each year. There is something a little sad about seeing an artist's work in shows and galleries over and over that is old. I judge a few art shows each year and it is frankly, a turn off to see the same recycled work from an artist. I automatically wonder if they are growing and producing, or just painting enough paintings to show them over and over again.

Tomorrow I'll give out some suggestions to prepare for a sale.

Friday, November 09, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



See my paintings HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE


My Ebay Studio Sale starts November 19, 2007 and runs through November 29, 2007 All paintings will start at 2.99 with no reserve and 4.00 shipping.



Painters Tip


More Color Mixing

The primary triad consists of red/yellow/blue. The second group, known as the secondary triad consists of orange/green/violet. In the secondary triad the contrast is softer. This occurs because in any pair of the triad there is a common color.

Where colors appear next to each other on the color wheel, we have the shortest interval and consequently the most harmonious relationship.

This is because three or four neighboring hues always contain one common color that dominates the group. (Analogous colors)

Many well known landscape painters like the primary triad color palette. I use it myself sometimes for field painting because is is only the three primaries + white, or + white and black for tinting and toning. It definitely follows the KISS rule. The paintings are harmonious but the drawback to me is that after a while all of the paintings look alike. There are only so many possibilities with such a limited palette.

Thursday, November 08, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings

See my paintings HERE

Art Note Blog HERE


My Ebay Studio Sale starts November 19, 2007 and runs through November 29, 2007 All paintings will start at 2.99 with no reserve and 4.00 shipping.



Painters Tip

This is a great way to study and improve your paintings. I like to take older studies and paint them again if I like the composition or some feature of the painting. The first painting below was done about five years ago on location, not corrected or touched up.

The second painting was inspired by the first one. I changed to acrylic for the medium and did the second painting in studio with the triadic palette. Even though I liked things about the first and especially liked the composition, I wasn't entirely happy with the palette or contrast in the first painting. Studying it to paint again has improved several aspects of the original composition.

This is a wonderful way to reconsider paintings and improve on technique, both in palette choices, composition, values etc. It is also a lot of fun. You end up with a good painting, usually better than the first effort.




Original painting was in oils








Second painting was in acrylics

Wednesday, November 07, 2007

Blondheim Art Original Paintings



Berries
10x10
oil on paper

See my paintings HERE

Art Notes Blog HERE


Painters Tip

Using a color wheel

I'm a big color wheel fan. I don't like the boring method of doing rows and rows of swatches. I like the practical study of color, doing small paintings with various color combinations. These paintings give you a real look at color and how it can be used successfully.

Keeping your color wheel handy will allow you to decide on intensity as well. Check your mixed color against the color on the wheel. If it is duller then you will know it is less intense than the tube color. Rarely does nature have the exact color that you get from the tube. it will not usually have that intensity. Using the wheel to help you make adjustments is the easy way to decide how bright or dull you need to mix the hues you are using.

The wheel will also give you lots of possibilities and help you to harmonize your color scheme for paintings. You can avoid a lot of bad color combinations if you rely more on the color wheel to help you make these important choices.

The new palette I am using for my work was developed over a period of months, experimenting with small paintings and using my color wheel.

I use a Rectangle (tetradic) color scheme. The rectangle or tetradic color scheme uses four colors arranged into two complementary pairs. This color scheme offers a lot of possibilities for variation.
Tetradic color schemes works best if you let one color be dominant.You should also pay attention to the balance between warm and cool colors in your design. Basically what I do is make either blue or green dominate, with red and orange compliments making up the neutrals. It's working very well for me.